Barnevelder Chicken

There is a town in the district of Utrecht called Barnevelder, in the Netherlands. It boasted an agriculture college that specialized in poultry. Back in the day, around the 1930s, this area was noted to have exported over 40-million eggs in a year.

It would appear that this is where the Barnevelder Chicken gets its name from. But the real origins of the Barnevelder are just like the above; it’s just a guess.


Double-Laced Barnevelder

Country of origin:

The Netherlands

Primary use:

dual-purpose meat/eggs


Male: Standard: 3–3.5 kg
Bantam: 1000–1200 g
Female: Standard: 2.5–2.75 kg
Bantam: 900–1000 g


Friendly, Active, Quiet, Lively

Recognized Varieties:

Double-laced, Black, White, Autosexing barred, Dark brown, Partridge, Double-laced Blue, Blue, Silver, Silver-black double-laced

Egg production (annual):


Egg color:

Light brown

Egg size:


Comb type:


Characteristics Of The Barnevelder Chickens

The Barnevelder chickens are medium sized, dual-purpose birds - suitable for both their egg-laying and table-meat. They produce around 180-200 eggs every year.

Eggs are speckled golden brown eggs, brown, light brown and cream colored. Chicks are quite slow growing which means they are only table-ready from around 6 months.

They are hardy birds, and do well in most kinds of weather, more so in the cooler temperatures. They love to forage and free range, although it doesn’t mind being confined. They are not good flyers though.

The most well-known variety of Barnevelder chickens is called the Double Laced. In females, double-lacing is a certain color pattern. The male equivalentwill be the melanized black-breasted reds. They are extremely attractive birds with fascinating markings. They have a single vertical comb.

The cock weighs in at about 8.5 lb. The hens weight in at between 6.5-8.5 lb.with cockerels weighing in between 10-14 lb. The chicks are yellow-colored and take quite a while before they start growing their dark feathers.

All chicken breeds of the Barnevelder have yellow legs and orange eyes. The feathers of the Barnevelders are varied. They can have black, white, brown, blue and blue-lace feathers. The hen’s plumage follows the natural contours of the bird and gives it an orderly and precise look.

The rooster is less showy than the hen, with his black plumage that has a green shimmer. The two birds together make a truly handsome couple.


The Barnevelder is like the typical traditional storybook farm-type chicken, with a friendly, calm nature, producing the large, delicious, speckled egg.

They are easy to tame and good with children. Being lazy-like laid back chickens, it is better that they free range which they love doing, so that they get their exercise.

The hens do get broody quite often, which gives them their docile temperament – they make excellent mothers. The rooster too, seems protective of the young chicks.

Likes and Dislikes of the Barnevelder

We Liked

  • Attractive to look at
  • Hardy
  • Good natured
  • plus
    Good egg supplier
  • plus
    Good mothers
  • plus
  • plus
    Make good backyard chickens

We Don't Like

  • Can be a bit rowdy when young, around 2-4 months

Is the Barnevelder Chickens a Good Choice For you?

The Barnevelder chickens, with their Dutch gene support a bird that can tolerate cold, damp weather rather well. But the chickens do better in well-insulated, coops that are draft-free.

Being quite shy, they enjoy plenty of human interaction and they even enjoy following you around. These chickens are easy to keep, going for years as they are good at looking after themselves. This is as long as they have their basic needs met of course.

Their coops and runs where they stay will need to offer protection from the elements, with fresh clean water and food provided daily.

They are wonderful as pets, happily producing their eggs and offering plenty of entertainment for years on end. They’re a good choice simply because they are such eggs-tra-ordinary birds!

Related (Chicken Breeds Information):

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